Teyana

Why Camp on Land When You Can Camp on Water with an

first_img The Best Sleeping Bags for Backpacking and Camping Why camp near a lake when you can drift into peaceful slumber floating over the water? That’s right, Shoal Tent was designed to be used on the water, under the stars. Can you think of a cooler camping experience? Neither can we.Logistics wise, Shoal is an inflatable floating raft with a tent topper that functions like any other tent you’d use — except you’ll set it up on a farm pond, saltwater flat, spring creek, or lake.“The world is your waterbed,” says SmithFly, the masterminds behind the concept.SmithFlySmithFly’s founder Ethan Smith started the company in 2010, combining his passions for design and fly fishing. However, you don’t need to be a fly fisher to justify getting this floating palace.Coming in at $1,999, Shoal Tent is roughly 130 pounds but packs down into a burrito-roll style carry and storage bag. (The full kit includes a storage bag, patch kit, and manual foot pump.) This makes Shoal super portable, or at least comparably so to a traditional tent (minus the poles). The reason you won’t find any poles in Shoal is the overall structure is completely inflatable.That being said, your tent won’t be waving like an inflatable AirDancer. Shoal stands up to high winds with no problem. The raft body has three separate air chambers, utilizing a design system much like gnarly tents made for extreme temperatures, making Shoal easy to repair if it tears. It’s Time to Ditch Your Sleeping Bag for a Versatile, Lightweight Camping Quilt SmithFlyThe tent fabric itself is also super heavy-duty, waterproof, and sealed with durable zippers. Each of the tent sides is attachable and detachable using heavy duty hooks and loops. Translation: It’s easy to get in and out, which means if your pocket knife sends your tent Titanic-ing, you can jump ship ASAP.Last of all, the bottom of the tent is a 6-inch-thick, stitched, high-pressure floor that doubles as an air mattress. You’re welcome, princess.Standing room accounts for up to 6’3″ in the middle, but more importantly, the inside perimeter allows for dudes up to 6’3” to lay down comfortably. “Taller than that you can rest your head on the tubes or sleep diagonally,” Shoal says.OK, where the hell do I get this tent in time for summer camping? Delivery time takes up to six weeks due to demand, so order as soon as possible.Article originally published July 5, 2018. The Best Cast Iron Camping Cookware center_img Editors’ Recommendations The Best Car Camping Gear for Any Season Hang Tight with the Best Camping and Backpacking Hammocks last_img read more

British Airways Unveils Gin Engineered for HighAltitude Cocktails

first_img 10 Best Gins Under $20: Just Add Tonic Could You Handle a Marathon, 20-Hour Nonstop Flight? Editors’ Recommendations 11 Best Gins for a Refreshing Gin and Tonic Smart Practices for Drinking With the Environment in Mind Ruben Earth/Getty ImagesA decent cocktail might be the only thing that makes air travel tolerable these days, but thanks to a dulling of our taste buds at high altitudes, even a premium gin or bourbon can taste surprisingly bland. British Airways is working to solve that problem with an exclusive, high-potency gin designed to bring the sexy back to mid-flight G&Ts.The British airline recently teamed up with makers at Edinburgh’s Pickering’s Gin to engineer a unique 10-botanical blend. The goal for the new Pickering’s British Airways Centenary Gin was to develop a flavor profile that eliminated so-called airplane “taste blindness” — one that worked equally well at high altitudes and on the ground. After numerous rounds of taste testing, they discovered lemon myrtle was vital to the recipe, adding the perfect amount of bold citrus and sweet. The blend also includes juniper, rose petals, and Scottish heather, plus some of Pickering’s signature botanicals like lemon, lime, cardamom, and cinnamon.Pickering’s GinScience has revealed all the awful things that happen to the human body when flying, especially on long-haul flights. We get gassy, our skin takes a beating, and oxygen deprivation makes us tired. Plus, a Lufthansa study proved that our sense of taste dulls at higher altitudes with sweet and salty sensitivity dropping by up to 30%. Dry air, low pressure, plastic cups, and even the constant background roar of a jet engine can affect how we perceive taste. It’s a problem that most air travelers aren’t aware of, but it can make notoriously lackluster airline food (and the drinks that complement it) seem to taste even worse than it already does.Thankfully, airlines have known about the issue for years, and have been quietly working to combat it. In 2017, Cathay Pacific partnered with Hong Kong Beer Co. to create Betsy, the world’s first high-altitude beer. To bolster the flavor, the makers carbonated the beer 10% higher than average and added Dragon Eye fruit from Hong Kong and English Fuggle hops.The Pickering’s British Airways Centenary Gin is now available aboard all of the airline’s economy flights under four hours. It’ll be served as the go-to premium gin and tonic with Schweppes 1783 and a lemon wedge over ice. Passengers can also purchase it as part of a limited-edition gin flight gift pack on board all of the airline’s non-EU and long-haul flights. Major Airline Admits to Monitoring Passengers Via Onboard Cameras last_img read more

Stop the presses Newspapers snubbed in Liberal governments cultural policy

VANCOUVER — The Canadian government’s new cultural strategy all but snubs so-called legacy media, industry experts say, and left out some key measures that could have given a boost to struggling newspapers expected in the lead-up to the long-awaited announcement.“I’m disappointed that the minister didn’t spell out more specifically her support for news media in Canada,” said Bob Cox, chair of News Media Canada, a group representing more than 800 print and digital media titles in the country.He was one of several voices lobbying the government to grow the Canadian Periodical Fund, which supports magazines, periodicals and local newspapers, from $75 million a year to $350 million.But Heritage Minister Melanie Joly left little doubt Thursday that the Liberal government finds little favour with traditional print news models.“Our approach will not be to bail out industry models that are no longer viable,” she said. Instead, the government will focus on supporting innovation, experimentation and the transition to digital platforms.The new framework doesn’t increase the amount of money in the fund, but will expand who is eligible to receive money, such as digital-only periodicals.All that means, says Cox, is that more organizations will be fighting over an already limited amount of money.“We didn’t get anything we were asking for,” he said.The group will make recommendations to the department about how to restructure the fund and how to support innovation and transition going forward, Cox said.Ottawa is ignoring an ongoing crisis in Canadian newsrooms, he said, and the onus remains on newspapers to create solutions and reinvent themselves as newsrooms are racked with layoffs and dwindling ad revenues.“The idea that there should be public support for our newsrooms is really off the table now and that’s disappointing,” he said.The government’s commitment to news media through changes to the periodical fund is quite vague, said April Lindgren, an associate professor at Ryerson University’s School of Journalism in Toronto.“I think that they’re taking a very much hands off let the market sort it out approach,” she said, adding that public opinion is divided on government subsidies to news media.She thought the federal government might embrace some tax changes to make it easier for news organizations to operate as non-profit organizations and receive funding from foundations.Removing obstacles to philanthropic financing was one of several recommendations that came out of a report from the Public Policy Forum in January. The minister ordered the study as part of a broader review of Canada’s media landscape.Lindgren said she’s surprised the government didn’t make such changes.While the policies relating to news media are vague at this point, Postmedia CEO Paul Godfrey gleaned some positive elements.“Some of the things I’m pleased with is some consideration being given to innovation and experimentation,” he said.The government said it “will give consideration to ways to better support innovation, business development, start-ups and export,” which it will present next year.Postmedia is actively involved in innovation, Godfrey said, pointing to the organization’s launch of a digital development lab at Communitech Hub in Waterloo, Ont., in 2016. A development team there focuses on developing products for the company’s digital portfolio, among other things.While it’s unclear whether any funding will be made available or what the guidelines for it would be, Godfrey said he hopes Postmedia would qualify for any funding available.Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter read more

Womens Basketball Ohio State hosts Morehead State in first round of WNIT

The Ohio State bench celebrates Janai Crooms’ and-one basket in the second half of the game against Rutgers on March 3. Ohio State lost 66-56. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorAfter losing to Wisconsin 73-63 in the Big Ten tournament, the Ohio State women’s basketball team finished the season with a 14-14 record.As a result, Ohio State failed to qualify for the women’s NCAA tournament.Instead, being the highest-ranked Big Ten seed to not reach the big dance, the Buckeyes earned an automatic bid to the women’s NIT tournament, where they will take on Morehead State.History favors Ohio State in both this game and the entire tournament. This will be the second appearance for the Buckeyes in the WNIT. Their only other appearance was in 2001, when Ohio State won it all, taking down New Mexico 62-61. The past two WNITs were won by two other Big Ten schools, with Indiana winning in the previous season and Michigan in 2017. Projected StartersOhio State (14-14, 10-8 Big Ten)G — Carly Santoro — Redshirt senior, 11.5 ppg, 3.9 rpg, 1.2 apgG — Carmen Grande — Redshirt senior, 8.4 ppg, 3.7 rpg, 5.0 apgG — Janai Crooms — Freshman, 8.6 ppg, 3.5 rpg, 2.1 apgF — Dorka Juhasz — Freshman, 11.6 ppg, 8.9 rpg, 0.9 apgF — Makayla Waterman — Redshirt senior, 7.8 ppg, 5.4 rpg, 1.8 apgMorehead State (23-10, 13-5 Ohio Valley).G — Miranda Crockett — Senior, 18.4 ppg, 7.2 rpg, 1.7 apgG — Darianne Seward — Redshirt senior, 9.2 ppg, 2.8 rpg, 3.0 apgG — Crystal Simmons-Cozar — Redshirt senior, 6.5 ppg, 3.1 rpg, 3.6 apgF — McKenzie Calvert — Redshirt senior, 12.9 ppg, 4.0 rpg, 3.1 apgF — Tierra McGowan — Senior, 6.5 ppg, 9.0 rpg, 0.4 apgOhio State’s biggest concern will be finding ways to become consistent. Heading into the final few games of the season, the Buckeyes were riding a four-game winning streak that featured wins against Rutgers, a team that made the NCAA tournament, and two wins against Wisconsin. During its final regular season game and its matchup against the Badgers in the Big Ten tournament, Ohio State unraveled late. The Buckeyes recorded 30 turnovers, allowing the Scarlet Knights to come back in the second half. Against Wisconsin, the Buckeyes were unable to find the basket and the Badgers thrived from 3. If Ohio State wants to bounce back and have a chance at winning, it will need to find a way to control the game in the second half. For Morehead State, the main threats the Buckeyes will have to watch out for are senior guard Miranda Crockett and redshirt senior forward McKenzie Calvert. Both are averaging double digits in points for the season and, with three players from the Eagles’ starting five having more than 100 assists on the season, plenty of playmakers will be on the court in Columbus Wednesday night. In addition, Simmons-Cozar is the Eagles’ biggest threat from the 3-point line. She is shooting 36 percent from deep on 72 attempts.Being the better seed, the Buckeyes do have the advantage of playing at the Schottenstein Center. Over the season, Ohio State holds a 9-5 home record. Ohio State will take on Morehead State at 7:00 p.m. Thursday at the Schottenstein Center. read more