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More than 5,000 children abandon education in mica mine of Jharkhand, Bihar, to work as laborers

first_imgOver 5,000 children in the age group of 6 to 14 years have abandoned education in mica mining districts of Jharkhand and Bihar, and a section of them have started working as labourers to supplement their family income, according to a government survey.More than 22,000 children are employed as child labors The survey was conducted by the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR) after a report by Terre Des Hommes, an international development agency working in India, revealed last year that more than 22,000 children are employed as child labourers in the mica mining areas of Jharkhand and Bihar.In its survey, the NCPCR said it has observed that a section of children in the mica mining areas are deprived of opportunities and have started working as labourers to supplement their family income.The survey was conducted in the districts of Koderma and Giridih in Jharkhand and Nawada district in Bihar.”As per the survey, there are 4,545 children in the age group of six to 14 years in the area of Jharkhand reported as not attending school,” the NCPCR said.The survey on ‘education & well-being of children in mica mining areas of Jharkhand and Bihar’ found that 649 children in the same age group were reported as not attending school in Nawada district of Bihar.The reasons for not attending school included lack of aspiration, lack of interest and also cases of collecting mica scraps, according to the survey.It also found that children in the age group of six to 14 years in 45 habitations of Koderma, 40 habitations of Giridih and 15 habitations of Nawada go for mica scraps collection.advertisementSelling mica scraps is the main means of livelihood for many familiesOfficials say selling mica scraps is the main means of livelihood for many families in these areas.”Several families do not see the benefit of sending their children to schools and instead prefer them working in collecting and selling mica scraps,” an official said.India is one of the world’s largest producers of mica, with Jharkhand and Bihar being the main mica producing states in the country. Mica is used in various sectors, including buildings and electronics, and even in cosmetics and paint production.The commission said the supply chain of the mica mining and industry should be made free of child labour.No child to be engaged in any part of the mica mining process and collecting scraps- NCPCR”No child to be engaged in any part of the mica mining process and collecting scraps. NGOs/development agencies should work with the local and district administration as well as with the industries to chalk out a strategy to make the supply chain of mica mining free of child labour,” the NCPCR said.The commission recommended strict action against buyers of mica scraps from children and said a special drive to abolish child labour in the mica mining areas of Jharkhand and Bihar should be carried out by the administration.”Strict actions may be taken against the buyers who buy mica scraps from the children,” it said.The NCPCR also flagged the issue of malnourishment among children in these areas.”In case of Giridih and Koderma, the undernutrition cases reported in 14 per cent and 19 per cent of the habitations and villages, respectively in the survey area. In case of Nawada, 69 percent habitations have reported that some children are undernourished,” it said.Read: Bihar schools have the worst student-teacher ratio at 38, followed by Delhi at 35: HRDRead: PUBG makes its official debut in IIT Roorkee annual sports festivalRead:9000 schools shut down due to attacks on schools and violence in West, Central Africalast_img read more

Loblaw says it ordered 25 Tesla electric trucks wants fully electric fleet

MONTREAL — Loblaw Companies Ltd. says it is among the first purchasers of Tesla’s new electric truck.Canada’s largest supermarket chain (TSX:L) says it has pre-ordered 25 of the vehicles called the Tesla Semi.“It’s part of our commitment to electrify our fleet,” spokeswoman Catherine Thomas said.Earlier this month, Loblaw committed to have a fully electric fleet as part of the company’s commitment to reduce its carbon footprint by 2030.That would involve adding 350 zero-emission vehicles and more than 2,500 trailers to the fleet.The Ontario-based grocer said removing diesel from its transport trucks and refrigerated trailers could reduce more than 94,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions annually, the equivalent of removing more than 20,000 cars from the road.By 2030, Loblaw expects to have reduced emissions from electricity use by 35 per cent, transportation by 25 per cent, and refrigerants by 50 per cent.First deliveries of the Tesla trucks are expected in 2019.No price for the trucks was provided, but reservations for the Tesla Semi cost US$5,000 per truck.Wal-Mart says it has also pre-ordered 15 vehicles, including 10 for its Canadian routes.“We have a long history of testing new technology — including alternative-fuel trucks — and we are excited to be among the first to pilot this new heavy-duty electric vehicle,” Wal-Mart spokesman Ryan Curell wrote in an email.“We believe we can learn how this technology performs within our supply chain, as well as how it could help us meet some of our long-term sustainability goals, such as lowering emissions.”Tesla declined to identify any other Canadian buyers for the truck that it says can go from zero to 100 kph in five seconds without a trailer, compared to 15 seconds for a comparable diesel truck.It says the Tesla Semi requires no shifting for smooth acceleration and its brakes recover 98 per cent of kinetic energy to the battery.“Overall, the Semi is more responsive, covers more miles than a diesel truck in the same amount of time, and more safely integrates with passenger car traffic,” it said on the company’s website.Tesla says that a fully loaded Semi consumes less than two kilowatt-hours of energy per mile and has a range of about 800 kilometres. That could save owners at least US$200,000 in fuel costs over 1.6 million km.The Canadian Press read more