Gabriela

Youll Have to Pay Big for 1 of the 271 Bottles of

first_imgSazeracUltra-luxury Scotch whiskies are, as you know if you’re a consistent reader of The Manual, a fairly common occurrence (when you think about how many distilleries there used to be, how many still exist, and other factors). Not that each individual luxury whisky is common, though. The newest release from Last Drop Distillers, a Glenrothes Single Malt Scotch from 1969, is a testament to that, with a total release of only 271 bottles.This is the second in a trilogy of Glenrothes releases from their spirits collection. The first release was the 1968 Single Malt Scotch Whisky. The current release includes bottling from two casks, laid down 50 years ago in the Speyside region of Scotland. Most of the barrels from the distillation were included in previous, younger bottles of Glenrothes, but Last Drop Distillers acquired these exclusive ex-bourbon barrels years later. Bottled early this year, one of the casks filled 130, while the other poured 141. With just 271 bottles available, the Scotch will have the (steep) suggested retail price of $6,250. “We are delighted with the second of our trilogy of old Glenrothes single malts,” a statement from Last Drop Distillers reads. “Only a very fortunate few will have the chance to sample these exceptional spirits, which are wonderful examples of fine distilling from the 1960s. Each sip transports you back to the heady days of flower power when revolution was in the air and on the radio. We commend to all those who truly appreciate the scent and taste of a magnificent old Scotch from a bygone era. You will not be disappointed.”Esteemed whisky writer Charles Maclean provided tasting notes for the exclusive bottles. Despite similar aromas, Cask No. 16203 “appears less fruity, with snuffed candle at the base.” Cask No. 16207 “has a smooth texture, with sweet and sour taste and a long, warming finish.”Cask No. 16207 also received some honors from Jim Murray’s Whisky Bible 2019, including Best Single Malt of the Year (Single Cask) and Best Single Malt 41 Years & Over. Those who can shell out more than six grand for a bottle of whisky can check out where they’re being held on the Last Drop Distillers website. It’s the 15th release for Last Drop Distillers in 11 years. Other releases include cognacs and bourbon, but the brand largely concentrates on Scotch whiskies. Last Drop was acquired by Sazerac Company in 2016, but remains on a quest to discover rare spirits to offer the public, so don’t expect the expensive, rare bottles to stop rolling out anytime soon. Getting to Know Rhum Agricole, Rum’s Grassy Sibling Editors’ Recommendations Helpful Wine Terminology So You Sound Like You Know What You’re Talking About Mezcal Unión Takes a People-First Approach to Making Spirits Glenfiddich Grand Cru Makes a French Connection with 23-Year-Old Scotch The Best Blended Scotch Whiskies to Add to Your Collection last_img read more

New local media outlets crop up as traditional community papers close

TORONTO — Dave Bidini asks “what if” a lot.As in, what if the mainstream press didn’t care about George Clooney building a house on Lake Cuomo? Maybe, just maybe, he says as he sprinkles in a few profanities, communities would be better off.Next month, the prolific musician, author and general man-about-Toronto, will be trudging door to door delivering his most recent creation: a 20-page broadsheet newspaper called the West End Phoenix. It will be a community rag, served without advertisements once a month with a focus on a few west-end neighbourhoods.“We used to have a whack of really, really great community papers, but they’re all glorified flyer-mobiles now,” Bidini says, his voice rising.“Goddammit, we’re in Toronto, we’re in this amazing city and we’re in this catchment in the west end where there are so many stories and we need a paper that will focus on the community. And you know what, the lane is wide open for us.”Bidini is betting on the community where he lives to respond. He has budgeted about $300,000 for the first year for 12 issues and says he’s raised about 40 per cent of the funds needed. The money comes from a mixture of what he calls patrons, those who have shelled out $500 to $25,000. Count artists Margaret Atwood, Yann Martel and Serena Ryder among the donors.He says he has about 1,100 subscribers thus far and is hoping for 5,000 within a year. He’s going local.“We, as of a society, have to punch open those front doors and roll open those garages,” Bidini says. “In our times, it’s important for us to better know each other.”There is a paucity of community newspapers in Canada, according to research by a Ryerson University journalism professor. April Lindgren runs the Local News Research Project that puts numbers to the mass extinction of news organizations. Her research has led her to dub the situation across Canada as “local news poverty.”Since 2008, 194 news organizations have closed in Canada, either outright or due to mergers, her research shows. Only 62 new ones have popped up over the same time period. She is continually updating the numbers, she says.“News is becoming a luxury item for a community,” Lindgren says.Someone like Bidini finds himself in the perfect position to launch a newspaper, she says.“You need money, education, background and contacts,” Lindgren says.Bidini can tick off some of those boxes and is using his contacts to find money.“I’m having dinners and coffees with potential patrons trying to shake the trees,” he says.Lindgren points to American research that shows people who live in more affluent communities tend to have more access to more local news than people who live in poorer communities.Yet she’s excited for any new news outlets, especially if it’s local.“Research shows the availability of local news is as important to a well-functioning community as a functioning sewer system, good roads, public health services and good schools,” she says.Nearly 700 kilometres north of Toronto, Jeff Elgie speaks of his burgeoning local news empire from Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. He runs Village Media and his crown jewel is SooToday.com, a digital-only news organization based in the northern Ontario city.They have news sites in four other Ontario cities: North Bay, Barrie, Timmins and Guelph, and they’re expanding. They’ve built their own publishing software that powers their sites and they also license it to other news organizations in Sudbury and Thunder Bay where they take a cut of digital sales, he says.Elgie is bullish on local news. He says on an average weekday, SooToday.com sees about 90,000 hits and 42,000 unique visitors, totalling about 15 million hits a month. This from a community with a population 73,368, according to the 2016 census.He says about 97 per cent of traffic is from local stories.“What we’re just doing is what a community newspaper did 20 years ago,” Elgie says. “It’s not that brilliant, really, we’re just focusing on local.”He says he won’t go anywhere near Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver, but is targeting small- to medium-sized cities with populations from 40,000 people to 200,000. He also targets areas that have their own distinct persona, learning from their struggles in Barrie, Ont.“Barrie seems to act a little differently and in some ways behaves a bit more like (a) commuter community where there is not as much interest in engagement in purely local news, so we struggle there,” he says.Another important factor is the competition. He’s looking for places with a weak media landscape. He points to Guelph as a good example. They had already planned to go in there because it fits the profile, but when the local paper, the Guelph Mercury, closed in early 2016, they raced to enter the market and opened up shop eight days later with two former Mercury reporters in tow.The next experiment is to test an even smaller market: Elliot Lake, Ont., with a population of 10,498.They’ll leverage SooToday’s site since it’s so close and they’re already covering issues like crime and health care. He says he already has commitments from companies to buy ads that have nearly covered the new operations launch costs.Like newspapers of yore, his company is making money off obituaries, which they post for free but make advertisement dollars off of their popularity, and classifieds.“In the Soo, we have more used vehicles than Auto Trader does,” Elgie says.Back in Toronto, Bidini already has a few shoestring budget stories to tell. An old high school friend “who’s done very well” will cover printing costs. There is no rent for the newsroom space because they are considered artists in residence at the Gladstone Hotel.He’s pumped for the first issue, which will feature “massive photos and massive illustrations” to go along with both short and long stories.“We do whatever we want to do,” Bidini says.Then it’s back to the what ifs. What if the West End Phoenix is no different than the scores of news outlets that died?“Who knows, maybe we’ll be that, man,” he says, “but we’re gonna try.” read more

TSX remains in the red despite higher oil NY markets close slightly

TSX remains in the red despite higher oil; N.Y. markets close slightly lower by Alexandra Posadzki, The Canadian Press Posted Apr 16, 2015 2:59 pm MDT TORONTO – The Toronto stock market closed in the red Thursday even as oil prices continued their recent advance and the financial sector rebounded from earlier losses to reach positive territory.The S&P/TSX composite was down 64.10 points at 15,386.77 after rising nearly 62 points on Wednesday. Meanwhile, the loonie extended its gains for a third day, rising 0.80 of a U.S. cent to 82.10 cents.Chris King, portfolio manager at Morgan, Meighen and Associates, said the TSX could start to give back some of the gains it achieved in recent sessions as oil prices inched higher.“The market in general, over the last couple of days, is looking through the valley — which is the current energy price — and assuming that better days are ahead in the short term for energy, and that’s what the stocks are pricing in,” said King.He cautioned that although he is constructive on the energy sector in the long term, energy stocks could suffer over the next few weeks.“The danger is that although I think the long-term valuation may be appropriate, in the short term we’re still adding significantly to supply, and we really are crossing our fingers that demand mops up a lot of supply to put us in balance, allowing the true spot prices to move higher,” said King.“Really we’re going to have to see better earnings out of the energy sector to really support our overall valuations in the TSX, and that won’t come for a while. I think this is a decent level but I would have caution that we may see some pullback from this point.”On Wall Street, markets were relatively flat after a recent spate of uninspiring economic reports. For instance, the number of Americans who applied for unemployment support last week rose for the second consecutive week.The Dow Jones industrial average was down 6.84 points at 18,105.77, while the Nasdaq fell 3.23 points to 5,007.79 and the S&P 500 slipped 1.64 points to 2,104.99.Although analysts have been anticipating a rough earnings season, with the strong U.S. dollar expected to hurt profits at large, multinational companies, most of the earnings reports that have come in so far have beat analyst expectations.Citigroup increased its quarterly income as it trimmed expenses, making up for a decline in revenue and beating analyst predictions.“We’ve only had a handful of companies reporting but, for the most part, they’ve actually been pretty good,” said King. “The quarter might not go so badly.”On the commodity markets, the May crude contract rose 32 cents to US$56.71 a barrel, while the June gold contract edged down $3.30 to US$1,198.00 an ounce and May copper surged six cents to US$2.77 a pound. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more