Letters to the Editor for Sunday, Jan. 6

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionLegislative schedule is great if you have it Media ignores cop killing by immigrantMany times by omission, the media can prove its bias just as well as with a report. Such is the case with the murder of a police officer in California. I know a police officer’s murder to most media, unless local, isn’t very newsworthy. But in this case,  it bears telling.His name was Rolil Singh a legal immigrant from Fiji. He worked hard, even took language classes to improve his speech. On Christmas night, doing his job, he was shot and killed by an illegal immigrant with two prior arrests who was never brought to the attention of ICE because of the state’s sanctuary status — pretty much like your legislators want to do in New York. There, I told the story as you haven’t seen it on these pages. Hmmm wonder why?Alan BuzanowskiSaratoga Springs Trump is failing as a military leader, tooIt is indeed ironic that the president, a failed businessman, has chosen to blame conditions in Syria on “failed generals.”In his ongoing effort to blame others for his own shortcomings, he has now focused his criticism on America’s military leaders — leaders who have dedicated their lives to defense of our nation.For a man who never spent a day in uniform this is particularly shameful. He’s withdrawing troops from Syria, where terrorists remain, and sending them to the Mexican border. Is this the action of a man who understands the role of the U.S. military? I think not.Bruce CastkaEstero, Fla., and Canajoharie American people are not all behind TrumpIn his Jan. 2 letter, Lowell Montgomery states, “The Democrats have refused to accept the fact that President Trump won the election. Well he did. Get over it.”He is correct. Donald Trump won the election.He is the president. He also lost the popular vote by millions.The American people are not buying what Donald Trump is selling.“Get over it.”Michael BoehmSchenectady More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationCuomo calls for clarity on administering vaccineGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists For those of us in the real world, 2019 will be a full year of work.For those of us who work in the private sector we will be working till the end of December.We the people will be working five- and six-day work weeks throughout the year. Some of us will be working two jobs just to make ends meet. And if one is working on the family farm, well you know there won’t be a day of rest all year. That’s how it is in the real world of the private sector. Now if one was fortunate enough to be stealing a living in the public sector here in New York, you would be on easy street. If you happen to a lucky member of the New York State Legislature, you just recently got a 60 percent pay raise. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a part-time job that pays $110,000 for 61 scheduled days of work? How about having your work year over in June and not having to report back to work for six months? The legislative session starts on Jan. 9 and ends on June 19. How would you like having a work schedule like this?January: 7 days of work; February: 7 days of work; March: 16 days of work (only 5-day work week); April: 8 days of work; May: 12 days of work; and, June 11 days of work.All that is wrong with New York! Jerry FioreSummitlast_img read more

Industrial

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Covent Garden. The limited commodity

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MAB makes Manchester shortlist

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The real Ronson

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£300m West End investment flurry

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Stanhope loses Sainsbury’s job

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Keep calm, eat pork: Bali official changes tune, saying swine fever not confirmed yet

first_imgThe illness has killed over 880 pigs over the past two months. No deaths were reported in the past week, Wisnuardhana said.“It’s not a matter of whether it is [ASF] or not. The important thing is that there are no dead pigs anymore. The task is done,” said Wisnuardhana, adding that his team would continue to closely monitor the outbreak daily.The official’s change of tune could quiet concerns that the fatal virus will hurt Bali’s pork industry. Parts of the island’s population depend on pig farming for a living. The agency has been spreading public awareness that the illness is not contagious to humans and Bali-bred pork can be consumed safely. It is also presenting information about how to properly feed pigs and handle suspected ASF-infected pigs to prevent further spread Agriculture Ministry animal health director Fajar Sumping Tjatur Rasa said the ministry had not yet released an official statement on the matter as of Thursday. But just like Wisnuardhana, Fajar argued that seeking ways to mitigate infections was more important than declaring the causes of an outbreak. He added that the illness did not affect exports as the country was still “freely” sending live pigs from Pulau Bulan in Batam to Singapore with Singapore-approved biosecurity standards. Fajar estimated that the ministry was currently exporting 25,000 live pigs every month from Pulau Bulan while the country currently did not import live pigs.Statistics Indonesia (BPS) data shows that Indonesia’s pig export value was US$44.9 million between January and September of last year, up 9.22 percent from $41.01 million in the same period in 2018. About 14,893 tons was sent to Singapore in the first half of 2019, higher than the 13,194 tons recorded in the previous year.Farmers have complained that the unconfirmed announcement could ruin farmers’ earnings due to falling prices and low demand from the widespread worries ahead of religious festivities like Galungan, which usually causes a spike in pork consumption. Galungan this year will begin on Feb. 19 and end on Feb. 29.Bali Pig Farmers Association (GUPBI) chairman Ketut Hari Suyasa said on Thursday that Balinese officials should have waited for ministries to deliver an official statement as only ministerial-level officials were allowed to declare an outbreak.This is because lengthy procedures need to follow such an announcement, starting with the containment of pigs in affected areas and followed by the culling of sick pigs, which he estimated could cause trillions of rupiah in losses. “If regional officials are confident that the outbreak is true, how ready are they to mitigate the ASF?” Ketut said. “I don’t think that the decision was wise for the current situation.”Read also: ‘It’s safe to eat pork’: Bali launches campaign against swine fever outbreak with delicacies No pigs have been culled as of Friday and pork prices in the market remain normal, the Bali Agriculture and Food Security Agency reported.The agency’s head estimated that the deaths of the 888 pigs caused Rp 2.66 billion in direct losses at an average price Rp 3 million per pig.But Bali is not alone in facing the illness. North Sumatra has also identified pig diseases following an ASF outbreak that killed more than 50,000 pigs across the province last year. The epidemic also perturbed China in August 2018. It moved south to Vietnam, onto Luzon Island in the Philippines and reached Timor Leste by October 2019. It has resulted in the death of hundreds of millions domestic pigs, driving up meat prices and causing economic problems, especially in pork’s top-consuming country: China.According to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), ASF is caused by “a large-DNA virus of the Asfarviridae family”. While ASF is not a risk to human health, the disease can be transmitted to other pigs through direct and indirect contact, such as through “ingestion of contaminated material”.There is currently no antidote or vaccine, and the only known method to prevent the disease from spreading is a mass cull of the infected livestock.Topics :center_img African swine fever, a disease previously blamed for the deaths of nearly a thousand pigs in Bali, is now being called unconfirmed, according to an official, backtracking from a previous confirmation.Bali Agriculture and Food Security Agency head Ida Bagus Wisnuardhana said on Friday he only “suspects” that Afrian swine fever (ASF) killed the pig. The Agriculture Ministry will likely take another three months to obtain lab test results and confirm the source of the outbreak, he added.Read also: Bali confirms swine fever outbreak amid numerous pig deathslast_img read more

Saudi deportations of Ethiopians could fuel COVID-19 spread: UN

first_imgSaudi Arabia has deported nearly 3,000 Ethiopian migrants in recent days, despite concerns that such operations could hasten the spread of the coronavirus, the United Nations says.Since mid-March, the UN’s International Organization for Migration (IOM) has registered 2,870 Ethiopian returnees, all but 100 of whom were sent back from Saudi Arabia, IOM spokesman Alemayehu Seifeselassie said on Monday. A humanitarian worker familiar with the deportations, speaking to AFP on condition of anonymity, put the total at “about 3,000” and said most had arrived from Saudi Arabia in the past 10 days. “The expulsion and deportation of Ethiopian irregular migrants while their country’s COVID-19 response is under-prepared puts them in harm’s way,” Catherine Sozi, the UN humanitarian coordinator for Ethiopia, wrote in a position paper seen Monday by AFP.The migrants are kept in detention facilities in Saudi Arabia before being flown back to Ethiopia, and it is unclear how thoroughly Saudi authorities are screening them for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. The Ethiopian government had requested that such deportations be halted until it could set up 30 quarantine centers in Addis Ababa, Sozi said in her paper.But they have continued even though “only seven quarantine centres can host returnees” and “much work remains” to make Ethiopian quarantine centers compliant with World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, Sozi wrote. The Ethiopian Public Health Institute on Monday referred questions about the deportations to the country’s foreign ministry, which did not respond to a request for comment.Ethiopia has reported just 74 cases of COVID-19 and three deaths, but testing remains limited and experts fear the country’s weak health system could quickly be overwhelmed. Ethiopians have long looked to Saudi Arabia as an escape from poor economic prospects and state repression, hoping to find work despite not having legal status. To get there, many board overcrowded boats that are at constant risk of sinking during sea crossings that can last up to 24 hours. Up to half a million Ethiopians were in Saudi Arabia when officials there launched a crackdown on illegal migration in 2017, according to the IOM.Since then, around 10,000 Ethiopians on average have been deported monthly, including in January and February.The humanitarian worker said there was a two-week break in deportations beginning around the time Ethiopia announced its first COVID-19 case on March 13. But flights have resumed despite the fact that Ethiopia is straining to accommodate the migrants.”The quarantine measures currently in place need to be improved, and the current medical staff needs to be increased and better prepared and equipped to assist… all newly arrived migrants,” the aid worker said. “These migrants are very vulnerable. They have undertaken an extremely dangerous journey and many arrive in Ethiopia with high medical and mental health needs.” Topics :last_img read more

Oil rebounds in Asia after Saudi Arabia output cut

first_imgOil rebounded in Asian trade Tuesday, buoyed by Saudi Arabia’s decision to cut output more than it had pledged as the virus-hit world economy cautiously emerges from lockdown.United States benchmark West Texas Intermediate for June delivery was up 1.37 percent at US$24.47 a barrel in morning trade.Global benchmark Brent for July was trading 0.71 percent higher at $29.84 a barrel. Both contracts settled lower Monday after big week-on-week gains Friday.”Oil prices drew some relief overnight after Saudi Arabia announced they would cut a further 1 million barrels per day in June, bringing their daily production to just under 7.5 million barrels per day,” AxiCorp global market strategist Stephen Innes.”This reduction in production provided excellent optics encouraging other OPEC+ members to comply and even offer additional voluntary cuts, which should quicken the global oil markets’ rebalancing act,” he said, referring to the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and their partners.ANZ Bank said the move would take Saudi Arabia’s output to the lowest level since mid-2002. Top crude producers agreed last month to slash output by 10 million barrels a day from May 1 after prices crashed to below zero as lockdowns to contain the coronavirus pandemic sapped global demand and supplies swelled.Kuwait said it would cut an additional 80,000 barrels per day and the United Arab Emirates announced it would slash 100,000 bpd to support Saudi Arabia’s move.Doubts, however, remain about “the ability of producers to implement and sustain the cuts,” ANZ Bank said in a note.”Producers also seem ready to increase output as soon as prices rebound.”At the same time, analysts said moves to gradually reopen businesses have increased the risks of a second wave of virus infections.Innes said there remains a “high degree of trepidation around… the risk of new outbreaks of the virus arising,” citing pick ups in infections in Germany and South Korea.”Unfortunately for global markets in general, this will continue to be a theme likely until effective vaccines are made available to the masses,” he said.Topics :last_img read more

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